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My Dog is Pregnant

Midwifery 101 - What to expect when your dog is expecting

Is my dog pregnant?

In the days before high walls and fences in South Africa, it was quite common for dogs to roam around freely in cities and towns; and it was not uncommon to discover out of the blue, that your female dog at home may be pregnant without you knowing how she fell pregnant.

Having said that, in those days most people who had an un-spayed (unsterilized) bitch at home, would have known very well that she was “in season” or “on heat”, which is the time the female dog is ready to ovulate and mate, because the whole neighbourhoods’ male dogs would have been howling at the door for “a piece of the action”.



My Collie is bumping into things and seems to have difficulty with its eye sight

Collie Eye Anomaly

What is Collie eye anomaly?

Collie Eye Anomaly is an inherited condition affecting both eyes of many different Collie type breeds of dogs. Interesting to note, that not only Collie breeds are affected but also some other breeds. Affected breeds include Rough and Smooth Collies, the Shetland Sheepdog, the Australian Shepherd, the Border Collie, the Lancashire Heeler, and the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever. 



From Kitten to Cat

Kitten Behaviour

Tiny fuzz-balls of cuteness - the perfect description for every kitten. We cannot resist them creeping into our hearts. 

You have brought your new kitten home and realise it is dependent on you for its every need. For the kitten, the world is huge, brand new and can be a bit scary. Every sight, sound, smell, person and animal are a new experience. These first experiences are likely to influence their future behaviour.



My cat has suddenly gone lame in her hindquarters and seems to be in a lot of pain

Feline Aortic Thromboembolism

What is Feline Aortic Thromboembolism?

Feline Aortic Thromboembolism (ATE) is a condition in cats where a big blood clot settles and blocks the main artery (the aorta) running from the heart to the cat’s hind legs.  The clot typically settles near the pelvis, where the aorta divides into the two main arteries that extend into the legs.



My cat's eyes are swollen and teary

Conjunctivitis in Cats

What is conjunctivitis?

Conjunctivitis is the inflammation of the conjunctiva. The conjunctiva is the thin semi-transparent mucous membrane lining the inside of the eyelids, covering the third eyelid. This membrane attaches to the globe of the eye at the level of the sclera (the white part of the eye). The back end of the word conjunctivitis (– itis) refers to inflammation which is a defense mechanism of the body and means swelling, redness, increased heat to the local area because of an increase in blood flow to the affected area, and pain or discomfort. Conjunctivitis is a very common condition affecting our household cats.



There is something wrong with my dog's eyes

Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca - Dry eye

What is “dry eye?”

Keratocunjunctivitis Sicca (KCS) or dry eye as it is commonly known, is a condition found in humans and animals where the eyes do not produce enough tears or moisture for the eyeballs to stay moist and shiny.

Which animals are prone to dry eye?

The condition is common in dogs and rare in cats. Cats who do suffer from the condition tend to show fewer symptoms of eye problems than dogs.  Certain dog breeds are predisposed which include Cocker Spaniels, Bulldogs, West Highland White Terriers, Lhasa Apsos and Shih Tzus.



My dog has what looks like a red cherry stuck in the corner of its eye

Cherry eyes in pets

Introduction to cherry eye

A cherry eye is a non-life-threatening condition that occurs in dogs, and less often in some cat breeds.  It is an extremely descriptive term, as one can see an oval, bright red swelling in the inside corner of an affected dog’s or cat’s eye, resembling a cherry. As a pet owner one can easily become quite alarmed by seeing this, but fortunately, it only causes slight irritation to the dog initially and you will have time to attend to it and take your animal to the vet before the condition gets out of hand. It is never a good idea to just leave it be. The condition tends to occur more commonly in younger dogs and cats, usually between the ages of 2 and 6 years.



My dog's nose seems to be all clogged up and hard and he is not well at all

Distemper in dogs

Following recent outbreaks of Distemper (Hondesiekte in Afrikaans) in Kwa Zulu Natal and Gauteng, it is important to have an understanding of this disease which is fatal in half of all cases of dogs that contract the disease.



My pet injured its eye!

Trauma to the eye- eyelids and cornea

Just like in people, the eye of a dog or cat is a delicate structure that can be affected by a huge number of different conditions. This article will cover trauma to the eyelids, third eyelid and cornea.

Anatomy of dogs and cats eyes

The eye of the dog and cat is very similar in structure to the human eye but there are one or two differences. Both a cat and dog’s eye is globoid (round) in shape. The part of the eye exposed to the outside is protected by the eyelids and eyelashes, just as in people. The cornea is the see-through part of the eye. It is a thin layer, allowing light to pass through the pupil and lens to the back of the eye.  The white of the eye is known as the sclera. The conjunctiva is the pink part of the eye that can be seen between the eyelids and the eyeball. Dogs and cats both have an extra membrane, known as the third eyelid or nictitating membrane.  This membrane can be seen in the inner angle of the eye and sometimes it can cover most of the eye, particularly following trauma. 



The vet could not cure my pet!

Owner Compliance and the Role you as an Owner Play

First things first, there are always 3 parties to any veterinary consultation: The vet, the pet and the one often overlooked, the owner. For any veterinary treatment to be successful at least two of the three parties, namely the vet and the owner, are pivotal to the success of any intervention. As an owner, you are the eyes and ears of the vet in the home environment and most importantly no one knows your pet the way you do. The truth is we the vet cannot do their job without you. I am sure many have heard the saying that vets have it harder because their patients don’t talk, they can’t tell the vet what is wrong, or where it hurts. It is for this reason that a vet will require every bit of additional information they can get from you, the owner. Animals are as biologically complicated as people, in fact, most medical ailments affecting people can affect animals.



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